Relationship of Functional Movement Screen and Obesity in Children

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Duncan MJ, Stanley M, Leddington Wright S. The association between functional movement and overweight and obesity in British primary school children. BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil. 2013 15;5(1):11.

This study found that children with obesity have lower Functional Movement Screen scores. The authors concluded that obesity Children playing video gamescauses poor fundamental movement patterns which lead to abnormal biomechanics and could lead to subsequent orthopaedic problems as these kids age.

While I think this is true, I wonder if less coordinated kids are less likely to enjoy movement and exercise.  Would they then gravitate toward more sedentary activities such as video games and TV?  Basically, if exercise doesn’t feel good and I have been embarrassed by the pull ups and run testing I have to do in PE, why would I want to engage in exercise — I can be successful with a video game.

Kids with decreased motor proficiency tend to become obese adults. Further, when kids aren’t exposed to motor stimulating environments (think of being in the woods hopping across creeks, climbing trees, and crawling under logs) tend to be less active as adults. The lack of motor coordination may be at the root cause of childhood obesity. Our current society (less active, more electronics, less PE in schools) then fuels that downward spiral.

I would agree with Avery Faigenbaum PhD that if we can identify these kids who have poor motor coordination and intervene early, we can set them up for a lifestyle of activity.

What do you think?

 

Duncan MJ, Stanley M, Leddington Wright S. The association between functional movement and overweight and obesity in British primary school children. BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil. 2013 15;5(1):11.

 

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