Functional Movement Screen Injury Prediction

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Functional Movement Screen Injury Prediction Studies

O’Connor FG, Deuster PA, Davis J, Pappas CG, Knapik JJ. Functional movement screening: predicting injuries in officer candidates. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Dec;43(12):2224-30.

“Both Long Cycle and Short Cycle cohorts demonstrated higher injury risk among candidates who had scores ≤14 compared with those with scores >14 (LC: risk ratio (RR) = 1.65, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-2.59, P = 0.03; SC: RR = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.21-3.01, P < 0.01). Overall, 79.8% of persons with scores ≤14 were in the group with fitness scores <280 (/300), whereas only 6.6% of candidates in the group with fitness scores ≥280 had scores ≤14.”

Take Home: Functional Movement Screen score is associated with injury risk in Marine officer candidates regardless of the length of the basic training session.

 

Kiesel K, Plisky PJ, Voight ML. Can Serious Injury in Professional Football be Predicted by a Preseason Functional Movement Screen? N Am J Sports Phys Ther. 2007 Aug;2(3):147-58.

“The results of this study suggest fundamental movement (as measured by the FMS™) is an identifiable risk factor for injury in professional football players. The findings of this study suggest professional football players with dysfunctional fundamental movement patterns as measured by the FMS(™) are more likely to suffer an injury than those scoring higher on the FMS™.”

Take Home: Performance on a basic test of fundamental movement patterns is helpful in predicting injuries in professional football players.

 

Chorba RS, Chorba DJ, Bouillon LE, Overmyer CA, Landis  JA. Use of functional movement screening tool to determine injury risk in female collegiate athletes. N Am J Sports  Phys Ther. 2010;5:47-54.

“A score of 14 or less on the FMS™ tool resulted in a 4-fold increase in risk of lower extremity injury in female collegiate athletes participating in fall and winter sports. The screening tool was able to predict injury in female athletes without a history of major musculoskeletal injury such as ACLR.”

Take Home: It is interesting to note that athletes with history ACL reconstruction were included in the study. This may indicate that the Functional Movement Screen may be able to pick up some of the motor control changes that occur after injury that place athletes at increased risk.

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Phil Plisky

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