08 Jul 2019

Be Careful Which Gauges You Watch

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I am a numbers and information guy. The more information I can analyze the better. I particularly like

numbers when I can use them to track my progress. As some of you have read, this year I overhauled how I went about goal setting. My big goal for the year was being able to complete our backyard Ninja Warrior course. So I started by getting some baseline data of movement and capacity via my FMS, YBT, and FCS. This allowed me to know what fundamental building blocks needed to be in place for me to achieve my goal.

I went about addressing those problems, but not in the typical way. I went about addressing them through permanent lifestyle change — if I didn’t feel I could sustain it forever, I wasn’t going to start it. This entailed kettlebell training 2 times per week, MAF running (tons more coming on this in the next few weeks), and walking 2-4 times per week (I LOVE to walk).

So here are the results of the past 3 months:

  1. Weight exactly the same (I want to be about 10 pounds lighter)
  2. VO2 Max (actual chart above) steadily getting worse
  3. Backyard Ninja Warrior course still unable to complete

Not the best right? Maybe I should change my training methods? Maybe I should go back to the way I was working on goals in the past? Hold on, not so fast:

  1. I have stuck to and enjoyed my work outs
  2. I have had nearly zero low back pain (those of you who know me well know I can get a wicked lateral shift and pretty substantial pain)
  3. I was able to go to a Ninja Warrior gym with the boys and complete way more obstacles, including some short warped walls (the bigger ones are now on my radar)
  4. I feel great!

If I were watching the gauges society and sports science would have me watch, I would have been disappointed. But by having my goals tied to my highest values and making permanent lifestyle changes, I am achieving the goals that are most important to me.

By the way, I do think my weight (and more importantly body fat %) and VO2 max are going to improve to record levels ultimately. I just needed to clear the land and finish the foundation first. Doing the foundational things first makes the progress seem slow and ugly at times, but I know it will pay off

If you would like to hear more from me, join me at Functional Movement, Professional Rebellion, MedBridge, ProRehab & University of Evansville Sport Residency Program, or University of Evansville DPT Program.

Asymmetries are common in the human body and can lead to a wild goose chase in musculoskeletal assessment.  But how do we know which asymmetries are important and will lead to injury? Well, let’s look at some common misconceptions as well as the research.

Wild Goose Chase

Common Misconceptions About Asymmetries

1.  If someone performs well at their sport with an asymmetry, the asymmetry doesn’t matter.

Who ever said that asymmetry IS related to performance? Asymmetry is related to injury risk, not necessarily performance. While I am concerned about performance, I am more concerned about keeping them in the sport and participating without being encumbered by injury.

 2. Asymmetries are only important if they cause pain.

I am mostly concerned with asymmetries that cause movement inefficiency or are related to injury risk. To me,  asymmetrical fundamental movement patterns will lead to injury or inefficiency (i.e. energy expenditure that is unnecessary for performance of the activity).

3. There is no research that indicates asymmetry increases risk of injury

Those who have an anterior reach distance asymmetry on the Y Balance Test (Star Excursion Balance Test) are at increased risk of injury in high school basketball and multiple collegiate sports (Plisky 2006, Lehr 2013)

Those who have an asymmetry on the Functional Movement Screen (Kiesel 2013 in press) are at increased risk of injury in professional football

Strength and flexibility asymmetries:

        • Athletes experienced more lower extremity injuries if they had knee flexor and hip extensor strength asymmetries (Knapick 1991Nadler 2001)
        • Eccentric hamstring strength asymmetries were at greater risk of sustaining a hamstring muscle strain. (Fousekis 2011)
        • Hamstring/quad ratio asymmetry (Soderman 2001)
        • Ankle strength asymmetry (Baumhauer 1995)

Asymmetrical landing patterns predict second ACL tear in previously reconstructed athletes (Paterno 2010)

Bottom Line: I really don’t put much stock into isolated bony asymmetries (e.g. torsions, misalignments, etc.), but I do feel that modifiable movement asymmetries that are related to risk of future injury are extremely important. Further, the literature is replete with studies that indicate asymmetries exist after pathology (Gribble 2013, Hewett 2013).  Since previous injury is the most robust risk factor for future injury, we owe it to our athletes to normalize these modifiable risk factors.

What do you think?

 


About Phil

Phil Plisky

I want to change peoples lives through dialogue about creating an ideal career, injury prevention research, and return to activity testing.

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